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dc.contributor.authorBoisson-Dupuis, Stephanie
dc.contributor.authorBustamante, Jacinta
dc.contributor.authorEl-Baghdadi, Jamila
dc.contributor.authorCamcioglu, Yildiz
dc.contributor.authorParvaneh, Nima
dc.contributor.authorEl Azbaoui, Safaa
dc.contributor.authorAgader, Aomar
dc.contributor.authorHassani, Amal
dc.contributor.authorEl Hafidi, Naima
dc.contributor.authorMrani, Nidal Alaoui
dc.contributor.authorJouhadi, Zineb
dc.contributor.authorAilal, Fatima
dc.contributor.authorNajib, Jilali
dc.contributor.authorReisli, Ismail
dc.contributor.authorZamani, Adil
dc.contributor.authorYosunkaya, Sebnem
dc.contributor.authorGulle-Girit, Saniye
dc.contributor.authorYildiran, Alisan
dc.contributor.authorCipe, Funda Erol
dc.contributor.authorTorun, Selda Hancerli
dc.contributor.authorMetin, Ayse
dc.contributor.authorAtikan, Basak Yildiz
dc.contributor.authorHatipoglu, Nevin
dc.contributor.authorAydogmus, Cigdem
dc.contributor.authorKilic, Sara Sebnem
dc.contributor.authorDogu, Figen
dc.contributor.authorKaraca, Neslihan
dc.contributor.authorAksu, Guzide
dc.contributor.authorKutukculer, Necil
dc.contributor.authorKeser-Emiroglu, Melike
dc.contributor.authorSomer, Ayper
dc.contributor.authorTanir, Gonul
dc.contributor.authorAytekin, Caner
dc.contributor.authorAdimi, Parisa
dc.contributor.authorMahdaviani, Seyed Alireza
dc.contributor.authorMamishi, Setareh
dc.contributor.authorBousfiha, Aziz
dc.contributor.authorSanal, Ozden
dc.contributor.authorMansouri, Davood
dc.contributor.authorCasanova, Jean-Laurent
dc.contributor.authorAbel, Laurent
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-10T10:39:00Z
dc.date.available2019-12-10T10:39:00Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0105-2896
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1111/imr.12272
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11655/14094
dc.description.abstractTuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb) and a few related mycobacteria, is a devastating disease, killing more than a million individuals per year worldwide. However, its pathogenesis remains largely elusive, as only a small proportion of infected individuals develop clinical disease either during primary infection or during reactivation from latency or secondary infection. Subacute, hematogenous, and extrapulmonary disease tends to be more frequent in infants, children, and teenagers than in adults. Life-threatening primary TB of childhood can result from known acquired or inherited immunodeficiencies, although the vast majority of cases remain unexplained. We review here the conditions conferring a predisposition to childhood clinical diseases caused by mycobacteria, including not only M.tb but also weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as BCG vaccines and environmental mycobacteria. Infections with weakly virulent mycobacteria are much rarer than TB, but the inherited and acquired immunodeficiencies underlying these infections are much better known. Their study has also provided genetic and immunological insights into childhood TB, as illustrated by the discovery of single-gene inborn errors of IFN- immunity underlying severe cases of TB. Novel findings are expected from ongoing and future human genetic studies of childhood TB in countries that combine a high proportion of consanguineous marriages, a high incidence of TB, and an excellent clinical care, such as Iran, Morocco, and Turkey.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.relation.isversionof10.1111/imr.12272
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.subjectImmunology
dc.titleInherited And Acquired Immunodeficiencies Underlying Tuberculosis In Childhood
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/review
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.relation.journalImmunological Reviews
dc.contributor.departmentÇocuk Sağlığı ve Hastalıkları
dc.identifier.volume264
dc.identifier.issue1
dc.identifier.startpage103
dc.identifier.endpage120
dc.description.indexWoS


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